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One for Brian...

Pinguicula Pinguicula planifolia germination pollination

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19 replies to this topic

#1 Aidan

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Posted 08 January 2009 - 07:05 PM

Crap photo, but is it what I think it is? Posted Image

Posted Image

#2 xave

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 01:15 PM

you think about planifolia?

#3 Sheila

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Posted 09 January 2009 - 10:26 PM

Is that a flower bud?

#4 Aidan

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 12:11 PM

A leaf. The plant is yet small. ;)

#5 Sheila

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 10:27 PM

The angle of the new leaf coming makes it look like a flower bud! Well it's a nice colour, the typical purpley red colour of planifolia .

Does this mean you have replaced your camera at last?

#6 Aidan

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Posted 10 January 2009 - 10:33 PM

That's a negative...

#7 Aidan

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 06:06 PM

Brian is being a bit coy... :D But it can only be P. planifolia from his seed.

The interesting/annoying/disheartening/ironic thing is, the seed I sowed in a pot has apparently all died. What must have been a few stray seeds that floated into a tray about 8" away are apparently thriving! The tray is pretty much permanently flooded and I guess that's the difference.

#8 Frederick

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 06:19 PM

Looks like you found a bottleneck in P. planifolia germination? Is it possible that the initial seedling state for this species is completely aquatic ?

#9 Brian Barnes

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 06:49 PM

Hey All,

Indeed! I'm pleased to see that my beloved Pinguicula planifolia "giants" have officially made it across the pond. I've been growing this species as a submerged aquatic for years, much to the scolding and dismay of many fellow growers...  :whistle:

My exact techniques can be found on this Forum as well as my FCPS Forum. I've had many reports of seed germinating months later after sowing, only after water levels were raised significantly to a constant near-flooded state, which in my opinion, expels the myth of only fresh seed germinating. I believe that Sheila's seed germinated after four months, once water levels were profoundly increased.
I'm finding this to be the case with other Southeastern US Pinguicula as well...I've had Pinguicula lutea completely submerged now for over a month (closer to two) and it's beginning to flower! They are growing in one of the same containers along with a group of younger P. planifolia.
No rotten leaves or diseased crowns are present. My pet theorum is that this method of cultivation hampers the development of the classic fungal rot that often leads to their demise, although it does seem completely against the rules as we know it regarding Pinguicula cultivation...

Kudos to Aidan on his success!

Happy Growing,

Brian.

#10 Frederick

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 07:07 PM

Hey Brian, excellent initiative !

Our regular CPs are normally shielded from fungal attacks because of the very low pH. I won't bet money on it but we see the same in terrestrial orchids: those that grow in neutral or high pH are rather sensitive to rot from contact with organic material.

Anyway, looks like you'll have a field-day with this species: checking the amount and size of the glands (they look sparsely distributed), the viscosity of the mucus (is it less water-soluble ?), does it have a different diet  ... and I'm seriously looking forward to macro-photography of the seedling stage.

#11 Andreas

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 07:22 PM

Cough,  :dry:

I tried to grow P. planifolia "Giant" from seed in spring last year. My water level was very high, BUT I used the wrong medium as it seemed: a peat-sand-mix instead of dead LFS!  :(

Another try would be fine! Briiiiaaaannnnn.....???? ;)


Regards,

Andreas

#12 Aidan

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 07:30 PM

View PostAndreas, on Jan 12 2009, 07:22 PM, said:

...a peat-sand-mix...

Take a closer look at the photo Andreas... ;)

#13 Brian Barnes

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 07:35 PM

Hi Frederick,

And indeed you shall have your wish! Santa did manage to bring me a proper macro lens for Christmas... :D

I have witnessed P. planifolia 'in situ' with small larvae of sorts (possibly mosquito) stuck to the leaves while under three inches of water. Unfortunately, the direct sun conditions and resulting glare made the photos quite crappy...I do plan on collecting and identifying the trapped larvae during my yearly Spring Fl. Panhandle excursion.

The viscosity of the mucilage remains partially viable while submerged, but is much stronger in unsubmerged conditions. However the plant does appear to have the ability to feed underwater. However, secretion, viability and true effectiveness of digestive enzymes remain a mystery to me...yet another quest for my agenda concerning this remarkable species. And....the obsession continues!

Happy Growing,

Brian.

#14 Andreas

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 07:41 PM

View PostAidan, on Jan 12 2009, 08:30 PM, said:

Take a closer look at the photo Andreas... ;)

Then the question remains: WHAT THE HELL DID I WRONG???????



Rudy Ratlos

#15 Frederick

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 07:53 PM

Great to hear, Brian. From your observations it looks like planifolia is to Pings what psittacina is to Sarrs.

#16 Brian Barnes

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 07:56 PM

Hey Andreas,

Don't worry, I have eight fat capsules ripening on a tray of my plants as we speak, and a dozen more flowers on the way. I'll gladly trade some for a few pounds of good German bratwurst and saurkraut!  :D

Happy Growing,

Brian.

#17 Andreas

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Posted 12 January 2009 - 08:51 PM

:blink:

But Brian, how do I manage to send you Bratwurst and Sauerkraut as sending Food into the United States is prohibited????  :huh:

You should pay us a visit in good old Germoney to eat as much Bratwurst and Sauerkraut as you can!!! :D


Regards,

Andreas

#18 Brian Barnes

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Posted 13 January 2009 - 11:50 AM

Andreas,

I was only kidding!  :D Although, I would love to come and see Germany some day... ;)

Brian.

#19 Aidan

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 06:31 PM

After a near death experience and two years on... the plant is in flower!!! :punk:

Unfortunately said flower is just below the lights and the petal edges have been fried, so no photos. :(

Brian - How do you go about pollination?

#20 Brian Barnes

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 10:28 PM

Hey Aidan,

Excellent!

The flowers can be self-pollinated easily. I usually split the top of the flower to expose the stigma and anthers to make pollination easier. Use a toothpick and gently raise the stigma/flap that covers the anthers, get some pollen and apply to the central portion of the top of the stigma/flap...and presto! The pod should begin swelling in about a week if successful... : )

Brian





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Pinguicula, Pinguicula planifolia, germination, pollination

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