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Utricularia seed germination

Utricularia Utricularia calycifida seed germination

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6 replies to this topic

#1 Dieter

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 08:41 AM

Hi all,

I frequently mentioned my preferred germination method which I use for Utricularia and Pinguicula, but also sometimes for some Drosera. It is quite simple. The seeds are sown quickly and until they germinate I do not have much more to do than checking the seeds every once in a while.

The seeds are sown on a small piece of wet tissue (like kleenex) in a saucer or anything like this. Then the container is closed by some plastic foil as used in the kitchen. I am currently used a more high tech version of this: petri dishes. They already come with a lid.
The containers are then put in place where they get enough light but no direct sun (at least not if I do not want to cook them). All I now have to do is to wait and to check every once in a while if they need a little more water.

Do not forget to write the name and any other information you need on the cover. The seeds shown here are U. calycifida white flower. The seeds were harvested on july, 1st 2006 (!), sown on january, 23rd this year and germinated about two weeks ago. I have to admit that I am quite surprised about the good germination rate for these 2.5 year old seeds. I already removed about 15 seedlings, so the germination rate should be somewhere in the range of more than 90 %.

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Once the seeds germinate, I plant them into their normal substrate and make sure they get high humidity at the beginning. In case of U. calycifida this is easily achieved as I grow them mostly in dead sphagnum moss anyway.
The plants will probably need a bit more than half a year until they start flowering.

Good luck
Dieter

#2 Frederick

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 10:10 AM

That's actually a great idea. If you use a small square of pressed cotton, you can move it to the pots without touching the seedlings or worrying about fungi - wet paper tends to attract those in great numbers.

#3 Daniel O.

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 08:30 PM

Hi Dieter,

very nice and useful description.

Some years ago i also tried this method (also with petri dishes ;) ) but the small and tiny roots have been growing into the piece of wet tissue. After removing them from there i?ve lost a lot of seedlings because of damaging their roots nethertheless i?ve been very careful.
Don?t you have these problems as well?
That?s the reason why i prefer to put them into petri dishes without any tissue.

Best regards,

Dani

#4 Dieter

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 11:58 AM

Hi Dani,

I do not have this problem with the current batch of seedlings, they are currently purely growing on top of the tissue and very easy to remove.

However, you are right that I made similar experiences in the past, especially with some tuberous drosera seed (e.g. D. menziesii ssp. basifolia to name one), but mostly with species which produce a long root prior to the first leaf. Such species are also difficult to handle using my alternative method, which would be sowing and mainly sand plus some peat. Most seedlings are easy to plant from this medium to the final medium, but species like D. menziesii and D. bicolor are very time consuming as I have to remove the root very carefully.

My solution for this was to plant the seedling together with a small piece of the tissue. That worked well.

Cheers
Dieter

#5 Jefforever

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 03:47 AM

Very nice report. I germinated some U. arenarias this way.... but the seed was 1 day old. :)

Good work Dieter!

#6 Rossolis-

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 09:08 PM

Very nice !
It's the first time that I see some seeds of Utricularia which is germinating...

I wait impatiently what comes next !
-Nathan-

#7 Brian Barnes

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Posted 01 March 2009 - 03:58 PM

Hi Dieter,

Thanks for sharing these wonderful germination tips! I'll have to try them myself...

Happy Growing,

Brian.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Utricularia, Utricularia calycifida, seed, germination

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