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New sacrificial plant

Nepenthes Nepenthes x ventrata

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12 replies to this topic

#1 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 24 May 2011 - 02:28 AM

I stopped by a local garden center Sunday, and came home with a nice Nepenthes that they had in their greenhouse.  Since it is marked Alata, I will assume that it is actually Ventrata.   :blush:    It is a very nice plant, with about ten pitchers, the largest of which is about 6 inches.  And they are a very nice, rich burgundy.  Very nice.

  I have it outside, hanging from the ceiling of our north-facing front porch.  Rinsed it out real well with some fresh rain water.  So, my guess is, it should be dead by Christmas.  New Years at the latest.   :(

  This is my second try with one.  With it being so hot and dry here in the summer, I wonder if I should bring it inside and let it enjoy the a/c with the rest of us?

Regardless, I will do my best.  I do fairly okay with the temperates, so try my hand at a tropical once in a while.  I have quite the knack for killing off the "anybody can grow one" plants.  Just ask the D. Adelae and various others that have ceased to be.

  I will try to post pics soon.  Just never know when it will kick the bucket and will be too late.   :wacko:

bp

#2 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 03:15 AM

Keep forgetting to get the pics out of the camera.  Just for the record, the expected pitcher die-off is happening.  Since it is so much hotter and drier than the greenhouse that I purchased from, I figured pitchers would shrivel.  Shame too, since they are doing such a great job catching roaches and ants.  There is new growth coming up, so hopefully it will adapt enough to put out some pitchers this summer.

#3 Andreas

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Posted 08 June 2011 - 07:22 PM

View PostBlaine Pullin, on 24 May 2011 - 02:28 AM, said:

I have quite the knack for killing off the "anybody can grow one" plants.  Just ask the D. Adelae and various others that have ceased to be.
Hi Blaine,

it could be me... LOL! You should then grow the more difficult plants (species). As much as it concerns me I can do better with difficult species...perhaps because I am a difficult person, too, and difficult species suit better to me... :lol:

(Excuse my silliness!)

Andreas

#4 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 01:24 AM

Hey Everyone,

Finally got around to getting my pics off of the camera.   These 3 shots are of my current sacrificial nepenthes.   I haven't given it a name yet, I don't want to grow too attached to it.  If it gets lucky and survives through to next spring, then maybe I will name it.  

I am actually quite happy that it is trying to put out pitchers.   There are a couple new ground (?) pitchers.  And maybe one or two trying to grow from the vines.

These were taken right after I brought it home.  Some of the older pitchers have dried and been removed.  I am totally pleased at how well they capture roaches and other critters.   If I can get new pics, you would be able to see how dark the cups are with victims.


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#5 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 12:42 AM

Just a quick update. We have a chance of our first frost later this week.  So I decided to repot my sacrificial Nep to get it ready for winter.  I still need to find a place in the house for it.  Anyway, I was able to get a nice 10 inch hanging pot which is considerably larger than the one it came in.  When I removed the plants (there are at least 3), the soil was just heavy peat.  I did break away some of the old root ball to loosen it up.  I then soaked some commercial phal orchid mix and some long fiber sphagnum for several minutes.  Put it all together, and it looks pretty nice.  I hadn't realized how much it has grown over the season.  Still putting out upper and lower pitchers and growing quite tall.  Looking at the pictures above, it is safe to say that the vines have at least tripled in size.  I will try to take a picture this week.  Pretty encouraging.  Now, if I can just get it to survive the winter....

Now one quick question:  I have seen that most people suggest Neps be given mostly shady conditions.   But every once in a while, there will be an article which describes either wild Neps growing in full sun, or cultivated plants in full sun.  I've seen photos of Neps out in the middle of nowhere, growing up the only fence post in full sun.   What are your thoughts?  Would full sun be okay, as long as it is protected from the hot late afternoon sun?

Edited by Blaine Pullin, 18 October 2011 - 12:48 AM.


#6 Aidan

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 12:48 AM

Definitely N. x ventrata and looking very healthy. Tough as old boots. If you kill this one, grow tomatoes instead!!! :devil:

#7 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 12:51 AM

With tomatoes, you only need to cut open a bag of manure, and stick the plants right in.  (this would be the part where someone would say that it makes the tomatoes taste like crap.  I would never do that  :innocent: )

#8 Daniel G

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 06:09 AM

I've grown a large one of these in shady conditions, and it refuses to pitcher, but a smaller one on a south facing window pitchers on every new leaf!
For this, sun definetly!

(I've repotted that larger one and put one of the plants on that south facing window to see what happens)
But yes, definetly N x Ventrata :D

#9 Tom499

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 07:45 PM

I've had one of these a few years. It just makes these tatty pitcherless vines, then once a year I cut them back and wait for the new growth. Its been in about 5-6 different places. I just dont think I have the humidity for them =P

#10 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 02:07 AM

Mine has been outside for the season.  Here in Atlanta, we reverted back to drought conditions for a while.  Definitely very dry most of the summer, with temps in the 90s F the whole time.  

Maybe your plant needs a bit more sun, or maybe repotted with fresh mix. You may wish to check with the experts here, but some people will use a diluted orchid fertilizer during the growing season.

#11 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 12:52 AM

Well Aidan, I am looking through the garden catalogs now trying to pick out some nice tomato seeds.  Yes, I think I killed it.  All because my sleep deprived brain forgot that I even had this poor plant.

It had been nice here in Atlanta the last couple weeks.  Temps near 70F dropping to 50 at night.  Some rain.  Definitely good for the plants.  Soooo, I put my tender plants out.  The D. Capensis, a couple orchids I'm nursing, some non-hardy succulents.  Well, near the end of this week, the temps finally dropped to winter levels.  30's during the day and 20s at night, and I brought the plants in.   So Saturday morning, I'm at the dining room table, staring at this empty hanger on the ceiling.  Then it hit me, the poor Nep was still outside.  I went out and brought it in.   The vines and leaves were frozen stiff, and had a sickly bronze hue to them.  Sigh.

Since it was only a couple days, and it is in a large pot, maybe the roots are okay.  I'm going to take care of it for a couple months, just to see if it will come back.  But, I think we know the answer to that one.

Nature has no protection from a fool.  Just the occasional preemptive strike.

#12 Aidan

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 01:40 AM

View PostBlaine Pullin, on 16 January 2012 - 12:52 AM, said:

I am looking through the garden catalogs now trying to pick out some nice tomato seeds.

There are some interesting heritage varieties available... :D

#13 Blaine Pullin

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Posted 16 January 2012 - 12:45 PM

I've always been partial to the Better Boy and Big Boy family of tomatoes.  Huge devils and pretty disease resistant.





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