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The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake

Dionaea Dionaea muscipula trigger-hair jasmonic acid sodium

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#1 Aidan

Aidan

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Posted 22 January 2016 - 06:32 PM

Full-text paper published in Current Biology available for download -

The Venus Flytrap Dionaea muscipula Counts Prey-Induced Action Potentials to Induce Sodium Uptake

Highlights
  • •Carnivorous Dionaea muscipula captures and processes nutrient- and sodium-rich prey

  • •Via mechano-sensor stimulation, an animal meal is recognized, captured, and processed

  • •Mechano-electrical waves induce JA signaling pathways that trigger prey digestion

  • •Number of stimulations controls the production of digesting enzymes and uptake modules
Summary

Carnivorous plants, such as the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), depend on an animal diet when grown in nutrient-poor soils. When an insect visits the trap and tilts the mechanosensors on the inner surface, action potentials (APs) are fired. After a moving object elicits two APs, the trap snaps shut, encaging the victim. Panicking preys repeatedly touch the trigger hairs over the subsequent hours, leading to a hermetically closed trap, which via the gland-based endocrine system is flooded by a prey-decomposing acidic enzyme cocktail. Here, we asked the question as to how many times trigger hairs have to be stimulated (e.g., now many APs are required) for the flytrap to recognize an encaged object as potential food, thus making it worthwhile activating the glands. By applying a series of trigger-hair stimulations, we found that the touch hormone jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway is activated after the second stimulus, while more than three APs are required to trigger an expression of genes encoding prey-degrading hydrolases, and that this expression is proportional to the number of mechanical stimulations. A decomposing animal contains a sodium load, and we have found that these sodium ions enter the capture organ via glands. We identified a flytrap sodium channel DmHKT1 as responsible for this sodium acquisition, with the number of transcripts expressed being dependent on the number of mechano-electric stimulations. Hence, the number of APs a victim triggers while trying to break out of the trap identifies the moving prey as a struggling Na+-rich animal and nutrition for the plant.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Dionaea, Dionaea muscipula, trigger-hair, jasmonic acid, sodium

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